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Yangon - Dawei
From $14
Yangon - Pyay
From $3
Yangon - Mandalay
From $10
Mandalay - Lashio
From $6
Yangon - Bagan
From $13
Yangon -Golden Rock
From $3
Kalaw -Shwenyaung
From $4
Mandalay- Myitkyina
From $25

Train Tours

Train travel in Myanmar can be a true adventure trip if you like to experience as local and accept for real infrastructure conditions in Myanmar. Generally, Myanmar’s trains are old. The tracks tend to pass through rural areas inaccessible by car, the pace is a bit slower, large windows provide fabulous views and there is often the opportunity to interact with the local travelers. Though train travel in Myanmar is not as comfortable as in other countries, the experience is exciting and amazing. In fact, the train ride is a highly recommended experience, over the old British-built colonial railway.

The Myanmar rail system was started in the 1870s by the British and has since grown to more than 5,400 km of railways with over 350 commuter trains. Whilst the network is vast and covers some beautiful parts of Myanmar, it is in poor condition with very little in the way of upgrades or repairs over the last few decades. The tracks are often uneven, resulting in swaying carriages or bumpy journeys making it uncomfortable or hard to sleep for some travelers. The carriages offer a first class option but this simply means a larger, cushioned seat- the air conditioning rarely works and the toilets are either local-style squat.

But perhaps because of this simplistic system, traveling by train in Myanmar delivers a unique experience. The friendly locals are often surprised to see foreign visitors on the train and often share snacks or drinks as a sign of hospitality. As there is rarely a dining cart on the train, each station brings a chance for vendors to hop onboard and sell items such as boiled quail eggs, green mango, fried dumplings or other snacks in addition to tea, soft drinks and juices.

If you love to see the authentic scenery of beautiful countryside Myanmar, train travel is the best way.

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Popular Train Routes

Train Tours
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Train Tours
Types of train and classifications

Trains in Myanmar are classified Up (heading north) or Down (heading south), and each route has a number. Each train route also has a designated two- or three-digit number.

Classes are divided into:

Ordinary class: simple wooden seats, usually very crowded. Available on all trains.
First class: usually wooden seats with cushioned bottoms. Only available on certain trains.
Upper class: comfortable, large seats. Be prepared for general lack of cleaning and upkeep – and broken adjustment mechanisms! Available on all trains.
Standard sleeper: four-berth and two-berth lockable compartments, with bedclothes provided. Washbasin and toilets at the end of each sleeper carriage. Available on Yangon to Mandalay and Mandalay to Myitkyina routes.
Special sleeper: self-contained compartments (maximum four people), with privacy (separate entrance, toilet, sitting and sleeping areas) but no access to the rest of the train. Water and fresh bedclothes provided. Usually only available on the Yangon to Bagan route.

Note that, in general, train conditions on the main Yangon to Mandalay route are superior to other lines around the country: trains are cleaner and air conditioning systems are more likely to work. Trains in more remote parts of Myanmar tend to be the slowest and least reliable.

Important notes on train travel
  • As trains are unreliable, arrival and departure times can vary. Yangon station has a digital departures board (in English), but few other stations offer this facility.
  • You will need your passport to buy a train ticket.
  • Many train journeys have multiple stop-off points, often allowing you to get out of the train, stretch your legs, and grab some refreshments.
  • Trains can get cold at night, so make sure to take warm clothes.
  • Even in upper class, seats can sometimes be a little smelly and greasy. Also, toilets are basic, and can be dirty.
  • Monks have free upper class travel; they are often very chatty and offer interesting conversation!
Types of train and classifications

Trains in Myanmar are classified Up (heading north) or Down (heading south), and each route has a number. Each train route also has a designated two- or three-digit number.

Classes are divided into:

Ordinary class: simple wooden seats, usually very crowded. Available on all trains.
First class: usually wooden seats with cushioned bottoms. Only available on certain trains.
Upper class: comfortable, large seats. Be prepared for general lack of cleaning and upkeep – and broken adjustment mechanisms! Available on all trains.
Standard sleeper: four-berth and two-berth lockable compartments, with bedclothes provided. Washbasin and toilets at the end of each sleeper carriage. Available on Yangon to Mandalay and Mandalay to Myitkyina routes.
Special sleeper: self-contained compartments (maximum four people), with privacy (separate entrance, toilet, sitting and sleeping areas) but no access to the rest of the train. Water and fresh bedclothes provided. Usually only available on the Yangon to Bagan route.

Note that, in general, train conditions on the main Yangon to Mandalay route are superior to other lines around the country: trains are cleaner and air conditioning systems are more likely to work. Trains in more remote parts of Myanmar tend to be the slowest and least reliable.

Important notes on train travel
  • As trains are unreliable, arrival and departure times can vary. Yangon station has a digital departures board (in English), but few other stations offer this facility.
  • You will need your passport to buy a train ticket.
  • Many train journeys have multiple stop-off points, often allowing you to get out of the train, stretch your legs, and grab some refreshments.
  • Trains can get cold at night, so make sure to take warm clothes.
  • Even in upper class, seats can sometimes be a little smelly and greasy. Also, toilets are basic, and can be dirty.
  • Monks have free upper class travel; they are often very chatty and offer interesting conversation!